Homa Delvaray is an incredibly talented designer and illustrator from Iran. Check out her work here.
With the guidance of Professor Marty Maxwell Lane, I developed this 24x36" poster series for a hypothetical lecture at the University of Arkansas by Delvaray. In researching Delvaray and the issues that her work addresses, my vision for the lecture became one centered not only around her, but around Muslims as a beautiful community that Americans largely fail to understand and appreciate.
Delvaray's work is a treasure trove of structure, pattern, and detail, blending together typography (in both Farsi and English) and architecture. Reconciling her style with mine was a challenge — I'd never really worked with 3-dimensional type before. I landed on isometric perspective as an elegant bridge between her dimensionality and my flatness. I felt it brought a harmonious, orderly structure to the piece.
The series is set in Tarzana, a quirky typeface by Emigre with the loveliest capital 'E'. The face works well alongside Farsi, the script used when writing Iran's official language, Persian.
The information is arranged in a modular system with overlapping lines of type. Some of the information is also set in Farsi to stress the inclusive, conversational nature of the event. "Flags" with short facts about Muslims' contributions to the world are found around the piece as elements to be appreciated on close inspection.

Each subsequent piece of collateral pulls apart, simplifies, and rearranges the complex structure of the poster in a slightly different way.
4x6" flyer — front
4x6" flyer — front
4x6" flyer — back
4x6" flyer — back
I chose a soda can as a more "physical" method of promoting the lecture because so much of Delvaray's work is concerned with the state of the environment. Crumpled-up cans found outside trash bins would draw conscientious citizens inward, both promoting the event and causing them to dwell on the relics of their consumption and their impact on nature.

check out more of my work:

Frazier Homes
I developed a minimalist identity inspired by early 20th-century craftsmen for a local contractor and applied it to business cards, yard signs, and shirts.
2021
Identity: James Lewis butcher & deli
I drew 30+ simple geometric food-related icons as part of a modular brand system.
2019
Digital Thinkers Conference
I made a type-tastic bilingual brand system inspired by complex urban landscapes for the annual technology and design conference in Tokyo, Japan.
2020
Data vis: "Partisan Pawprints"
As a reckless challenge to see how many different data inputs I could combine into one visualization, I chronicled five years of my life through travel, dogs, politics, and culture.
2019
Environmental design: Goose Egg Park
I made a series of egg-shaped, goose-themed icons intended to spur a grassroots movement to improve a small, empty park in Joplin, Missouri.
2018
STNDRD, the clothing brand for everybody
I made a quirky, expressive brand system for a clothing company focused on ethics and inclusivity.
2019
The housing rainbow
In my second project with Reimagine Arkansas, I made a quote wreath and a series of illustrations pushing viewers to think of housing as a spectrum.
2020
App prototype: Canopy NWA
I prototyped a volunteer coordination app in Adobe XD for a local organization that helps refugees from around the world resettle in Northwest Arkansas.
2018
Visualizing the Earned Income Tax Credit
In my third project with Reimagine Arkansas, I made a series of data visualizations on SB10, a bill that would create an EITC for working families in the state.
2021
Restoring the neighborhood collective
My degree capstone project investigated sparsely-attended civic meetings that make huge housing and land usage decisions in communities across the United States.
2020
Back to Top